2012-03-19guardian.co.uk

What rules the system has are designed to ensure the tems continue "to circulate, and work hard as a currency", said Christos Pappionannou, a mechanical engineer who runs the network's website using open-source software.

No one may hold more than 1,200 tems in the account "so people don't start hoarding; once you reach the top limit you have to start using them."

And no one may owe more than 300, so people "can't get into debt, and have to start offering something".

Businesses that are part of the network are allowed to do transactions partly in tems, and partly in euros; most offer a 50/50 part-exchange.

"We recognise that they have their fixed costs, they have to pay a rent and bills in euros," said Pappionannou. "You could say that their 'profit' might be taken in Tems, to be reinvested in the network."


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